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Season 7
The Year of the Story

September  2023

Anywhere But Here

BOOK TO SCREEN - Once Upon A Time

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The Little Mermaid is a literary fairy tale written by the Danish author Hans Christian Andersen, first published in 1837 as part of a collection of fairy tales for children. The story follows the journey of a young mermaid who is willing to give up her life in the sea as a mermaid to gain a human soul.

 

The original story has been a subject of multiple analyses by scholars such as Jacob Bøggild and Pernille Heegaard, as well as the folklorist Maria Tatar. These analyses cover various aspects of the story, from interpreting the themes to discussing why Andersen chose to write a tragic story with a happy ending. It has been adapted to various media, including musical theatre, anime, ballet, opera, and film. There is also a statue portraying the mermaid in Copenhagen, Denmark, where the story was written and first published.

 

The Little Mermaid is a 1989 American animated musical fantasy film produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures. The 28th Disney animated feature film, it is loosely based on the 1837 Danish fairy tale of the same name by Hans Christian Andersen. The film was written and directed by John Musker and Ron Clements and produced by Musker and Howard Ashman, who also wrote the film's songs with Alan Menken. Menken also composed the film's score. Featuring the voices of Jodi Benson, Christopher Daniel Barnes, Pat Carroll, Samuel E. Wright, Jason Marin, Kenneth Mars, and Buddy Hackett, The Little Mermaid tells the story of a teenage mermaid princess named Ariel, who dreams of becoming human and falls in love with a human prince named Eric, which leads her to make a magic deal with the sea witch, Ursula, to become human and be with him.

 

Walt Disney planned to put the story in a proposed package film containing Andersen's stories but scrapped the project. In 1985, while working on The Great Mouse Detective (1986), Clements and Musker decided to adapt the fairy tale and proposed it to Walt Disney Studios chairman Jeffrey Katzenberg, who initially declined due to its similarities to a proposed sequel to the 1984 film Splash, but ultimately approved of it. Ashman became involved and brought in Menken. With supervision from Katzenberg, they made a Broadway-style structure with musical numbers as the staff was working on Oliver & Company (1988). Katzenberg warned that the film would earn less since it appealed to females, but he eventually became convinced that it would be Disney's first blockbuster hit.

 

The Little Mermaid was released to theaters on November 17, 1989, to critical acclaim, earning praise for the animation, music, and characters. It was also a commercial success, garnering $84 million at the domestic box office during its initial release, and $235 million in total lifetime gross worldwide. Along with the major success of both Disney's 1986 animated film The Great Mouse Detective  and the 1988 Disney/Amblin live-action/animated film Who Framed Roger Rabbit, The Little Mermaid is given credit for breathing life back into the art of Disney animated feature films after some films produced by Disney were struggling. It also marked the start of the era known as the Disney Renaissance. The film won two Academy Awards for Best Original Score and Best Original Song ("Under the Sea").

 

The film's success led to a media franchise. A direct-to-video sequel was released in 2000, focusing on Ariel's daughter, Melody. A prequel followed in 2008. The first film was adapted into a stage musical with a book by Doug Wright and additional songs by Alan Menken and new lyricist Glenn Slater opened in Denver in July 2007 and began performances on Broadway January 10, 2008 starring Sierra Boggess.

 

Other derived works and material inspired by the film, include a 2023 live-action film adaptation directed by Rob Marshall, and a 2019 live musical presentation of the film aired on ABC as part of The Wonderful World of Disney.

 

In 2022, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".

Opening Credits; Introduction (1.19); Background History (14.13); The Little Mermaid Plot Synopsis (15.17); Book Thoughts (21.47); Introducing a Film (58.50); The Little Mermaid (1989) Film Trailer (1:02.28); Lights, Camera, Action (1:03.49); How Many Stars (1:50.42); End Credits (1:52.10); Closing Credits (1:53.48)

Opening Credits– Epidemic Sound – Copyright . All rights reserved

 

Closing Credits:  In Harmony by Jodi Benson.  Taken from the Little Mermaid Television Soundtrack.  Copyright 1992 Disney Records.  Kiss The Girl by Ashley Tidsdale.  Taken from The Little Mermaid Soundtrack  Copyright 2006 Disney Records.

Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 

 

All rights reserved.  Used by Kind Permission.

 

All songs available through Amazon Music.

BATMAN: The Animated Series

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I Am The Knight

 

Batman falls into the depths of depression after Commissioner Gordon is shot by the Jazzman during a botched raid. Batman was meant to be present but was delayed by thugs while paying his annual visit to the site of his parents' murder. With Gordon hospitalized and near death, the Dark Knight becomes consumed by self-doubt.

Only when the Jazzman escapes custody and attempts to murder Gordon does Batman snap out of his funk. His spirit is further renewed when he encounters a young man, he'd previously given up hope on, now on the road to reform and grateful for Batman's intervention.

 

Off Balance

 

While following Count Vertigo's trail, Batman encounters comes across a mysterious woman called Talia, who was sent by her father to prevent the capture of a sonic drill that the Count stole from Wayne Enterprises. On their quest to stop Vertigo, Talia learns Batman's identity and they are forced to work together in order to fight Vertigo's effects, but the more they collaborate, the more doubts Batman has about Talia's loyalties.

 

 

The Man Who Killed Batman

 

While a third-rate mob stumble-bum Sidney Debris was acting as look-out for drug runners, Batman surprised him on a warehouse roof.  The two struggled, and Sid’s bumbling caused Batman to pitch off the roof and into a shed of explosive gas.  After the ensuing fire, the only thing found was Batman’s cape and cowl.  It seemed Sidney had done the impossible and become the man who killed Batman. 

 

 

Mudslide

 

Clayface is falling apart – literally.  His clay like body is virtually disintegrating.  Fortunately, Stella Bates, a woman scientist he knew from his movie star days, tries to stabilise Matt’s decaying form by using a rare isotope stolen form Wayne Enterprises – the irony being that Bruce Wayne would gladly help if given the chance.  But Clayface is too hateful to yield, and winds up falling into the sea, where he dissolves into nothingness. 

Opening Credits; Introduction (.56); Episode One:  I Am The Night (49.49); Episode Two:  Off Balance (57.29 ); Episode Three: The Man Who Killed Batman (1:09.54); Episode Four: Mudslide (1:18.28); Favourite and Least Favourite Character (1:37.30); Favourite Episode (1:49.17); End Credits (1:51.40); Closing Credits (1:52.50)

Opening Credits– Epidemic Sound – Copyright . All rights reserved

 

Closing Credits:  Off Balance by Victor Ray.  Taken from the album Off-Balance.  Copyright 2023 ZOZO records. 

Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 

 

All rights reserved.  Used by Kind Permission.

 

All songs available through Amazon Music.

TWO FOR 1: Dark Families

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Pufnstuf (also known as Pufnstuf Zaps the World) is a 1970 American comedy fantasy musical film produced by Sid and Marty Krofft Enterprises and released by Universal Pictures. It is based on the children's television series H.R. Pufnstuf, a show that features a cast of puppets on a "living island."

 

The NeverEnding Story is a 1984 fantasy film co-written and directed by Wolfgang Petersen (in his first English-language film), and based on the 1979 novel The Neverending Story by Michael Ende. It was produced by Bernd Eichinger and Dieter Giessler, and stars Noah Hathaway, Barret Oliver, Tami Stronach, Patricia Hayes, Sydney Bromley, Gerald McRaney and Moses Gunn, with Alan Oppenheimer providing the voices of Falkor and Gmork (as well as other characters). It follows a boy who finds a magical book that tells of a young warrior who is given the task of stopping the Nothing, a dark force, from engulfing the wonderland world of Fantasia.

 

At the time of its release, it was the most expensive film produced outside the United States or the Soviet Union. It was the first in The NeverEnding Story film series. It adapts only the first half of the book, and consequently does not convey the message of the title as it was portrayed in the novel. The second half of the book was subsequently used as a rough basis for the second film, The NeverEnding Story II: The Next Chapter (1990). The third film, The NeverEnding Story III: Escape from Fantasia (1994), has an original plot not based on the book.

Opening Credits; Introduction (1.22); Background History (13.09); PufnStuf (1970) Trailer (29.44); Our Opening Presentation (16.29); Let's Rate (55.07); Introducing Our Next Feature (1:00.40); NeverEnding Story (1984) Trailer (1:02.11); Lights, Camera, Action (1:03.30); How Many Stars (1:41.31); End Credits (1:49.16); Closing Credits (1:51.23)

Opening Credits– Epidemic Sound – Copyright . All rights reserved

 

Closing Credits:  NeverEnding Story by Limahl.  Taken from the album Don’t Suppose.  Copyright 1984 EMI Records/Zap the World by Billie Hayes and Martha Raye.  Taken from the album PufnStuf.  Copyright 1970 Capitol Records

Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 

 

All rights reserved.  Used by Kind Permission.

 

All songs available through Amazon Music.

ANTHOLOGY

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Fantasia is a 1940 American animated musical anthology film produced and released by Walt Disney Productions, with story direction by Joe Grant and Dick Huemer and production supervision by Walt Disney and Ben Sharpsteen. The third Disney animated feature film, it consists of eight animated segments set to pieces of classical music conducted by Leopold Stokowski, seven of which are performed by the Philadelphia Orchestra. Music critic and composer Deems Taylor acts as the film's Master of Ceremonies who introduces each segment in live action.

 

Disney settled on the film's concept in 1938 as work neared completion on The Sorcerer's Apprentice, originally an elaborate Silly Symphony cartoon designed as a comeback role for Mickey Mouse, who had declined in popularity. As production costs surpassed what the short could earn, Disney decided to include it in a feature-length film of multiple segments set to classical pieces with Stokowski and Taylor as collaborators. The soundtrack was recorded using multiple audio channels and reproduced with Fantasound, a pioneering sound system developed by Disney and RCA that made Fantasia the first commercial film shown in stereo and a precursor to surround sound.

 

Fantasia was first released as a theatrical roadshow that was held in 13 cities across the U.S. between 1940 and 1941; the first began at the Broadway Theatre in New York City on November 13, 1940. While acclaimed by critics, it failed to make a profit owing to World War II's cutting off distribution to the European market, the film's high production costs, and the expense of building Fantasound equipment and leasing theatres for the roadshow presentations. Since 1942, the film has been reissued multiple times by RKO Radio Pictures and Buena Vista Distribution with its original footage and audio being deleted, modified, or restored in each version. When adjusted for inflation, Fantasia is the 23rd highest-grossing film of all time in the U.S.

 

The Fantasia franchise has grown to include video games, Disneyland attractions, and a live concert series. A sequel, Fantasia 2000, co-produced by Walt's nephew Roy E. Disney, was released in 1999. Fantasia has grown in reputation over the years and is now widely acclaimed as one of the greatest animated films of all time; in 1998, the American Film Institute ranked it as the 58th greatest American film in their 100 Years...100 Movies and the fifth greatest animated film in their 10 Top 10 list. In 1990, Fantasia was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".

 

Fantasia 2000 is a 1999 American animated musical anthology film produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures. Produced by Roy E. Disney and Donald W. Ernst, it is the 38th Disney animated feature film and sequel to 1940's Fantasia. Like its predecessor, Fantasia 2000 consists of animated segments set to pieces of classical music. Celebrities including Steve Martin, Itzhak Perlman, Quincy Jones, Bette Midler, James Earl Jones, Penn & Teller, James Levine, and Angela Lansbury introduce a segment in live action scenes directed by Don Hahn.

 

After numerous unsuccessful attempts to develop a Fantasia sequel, The Walt Disney Company revived the idea shortly after Michael Eisner became chief executive officer in 1984. Development paused until the commercial success of the 1991 home video release of Fantasia convinced Eisner that there was enough public interest and funds for a sequel, to which he assigned Disney as executive producer. The music for six of the film's eight segments is performed by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra conducted by James Levine. The film includes The Sorcerer's Apprentice from the 1940 original. Each new segment was produced by combining traditional animation with computer-generated imagery.

 

Fantasia 2000 premiered on December 17, 1999, at Carnegie Hall in New York City as part of a concert tour that also visited London, Paris, Tokyo, and Pasadena, California. The film was then released in 75 IMAX theatres worldwide from January 1 to April 30, 2000, marking the first animated feature-length film to be released in the format. Its general release in regular theatres followed on June 16, 2000. The film received mostly positive reviews from critics, who praised several of its sequences, while also deeming its overall quality uneven in comparison to its predecessor. Budgeted at about $80–$85 million, the film grossed $90.9 million worldwide.

Opening Credits; Introduction (1.00); Background History (15.06); Fantasia (1940) Film Trailer (18.19); Opening Presentation (21.15); Let's Rate (41.33); Introducing Our Second Feature (43.40); Fantasia 2000 (1999) Film Trailer (46.11); Lights, Camera, Action (48.12); How Many Stars (1:19.57); End Credits (1:24.29); Closing Credits (1:25.46)

Opening Credits– Epidemic Sound – Copyright . All rights reserved

 

Closing Credits:  The Age of Not Believing  by Angela Lansbury.  From the album Bedknobs and Broomsticks Original Soundtrack.  Copyright 1971 Disney Records

Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 

 

All rights reserved.  Used by Kind Permission.

 

All songs available through Amazon Music.

DOCTOR WHO:  The Web Planet/The Crusades
                              Dr Who and the Daleks (1965)

 

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The Web Planet

13 February – 20 March 1965

 

The First Doctor (William Hartnell) and his travelling companions Ian Chesterton (William Russell), Barbara Wright (Jacqueline Hill), and Vicki (Maureen O'Brien) ally themselves with the Menoptra, the former inhabitants of the planet Vortis, as they struggle to win back the planet from the malignant Animus (Catherine Fleming) and its Zarbi slaves.

The Crusades

27 March – 17 April 1965

 

The First Doctor (William Hartnell) and his travelling companions Ian Chesterton (William Russell), Barbara Wright (Jacqueline Hill), and Vicki (Maureen O'Brien) arrive in 12th century Palestine during the Third Crusade and find themselves entangled in the conflict between King Richard the Lionheart (Julian Glover) and Saladin (Bernard Kay). They also meet King Richard's sister Lady Joanna (Jean Marsh) and Saladin's brother Saphadin (Roger Avon).

Dr Who and the Daleks (1965)

is a 1965 British science fiction film directed by Gordon Flemyng and written by Milton Subotsky, and the first of two films based on the British science-fiction television series Doctor Who. It stars Peter Cushing as Dr. WhoRoberta Tovey as Susan, Jennie Linden as Barbara, and Roy Castle as Ian. It was followed by Daleks' Invasion Earth 2150 A.D. (1966).

The story is based on the Doctor Who television serial The Daleks, produced by the BBC. Filmed in Technicolor, it is the first Doctor Who story to be made in colour and in a widescreen format. The film was not intended to form part of the ongoing story-lines of the television series. Elements from the programme are used, however, such as various characters, the Daleks and a police box time machine, albeit in re-imagined forms.

Opening Credits; Introduction (.43); The Web Planet Synopsis (1.27); Television Thoughts (4.25); Let's Rate (25.04); Introducing The Crusades (27.04); The Crusades Synopsis ( 34.41); Discussing the Episode (38.15); Rating the Episodes (47.42); Film:  Doctor Who and The Daleks (1965) (53.08); Doctor Who and the Daleks (1965) Trailer (54.14); Lights, Camera, Action (57.24); How Many Stars (1:09.59); End Credits (1:14.56); Closing Credits (1:21.53)

Opening Credits– Doctor Who Theme. composer Ron Grainer and realised by Delia Derbyshire at the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. Copyright 1963 BBC World Music.

 

Closing Credits:  We’re Not Gonna Take It by Twisted Sister.  Taken from the album Stay Hungry.  Copyright 1984 Atlantic Records

Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 

 

All rights reserved.  Used by Kind Permission.

 

All songs available through Amazon Music.

MAKE/REMAKE

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Beauty and the Beast is a 1991 American animated musical romantic fantasy film produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures. The 30th Disney animated feature film and the third released during the Disney Renaissance period, it is based on the 1756 fairy tale of the same name by Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont (who was only credited in the French dub),[6] while also containing ideas from the 1946 French film of the same name directed by Jean Cocteau.[7] The film was directed by Gary Trousdale and Kirk Wise (in their feature directorial debuts) and produced by Don Hahn, from a screenplay by Linda Woolverton.

 

Beauty and the Beast focuses on the relationship between the Beast (voice of Robby Benson), a prince who is magically transformed into a monster and his servants into household objects as punishment for his arrogance, and Belle (voice of Paige O'Hara), a young woman whom he imprisons in his castle in exchange for her father's freedom. To break the curse, the Beast must learn to love Belle and earn her love in return before the last petal falls from an enchanted rose or else he will remain a monster forever. The film also features the voices of Richard White, Jerry Orbach, David Ogden Stiers, and Angela Lansbury.

 

Walt Disney first attempted to adapt Beauty and the Beast into an animated film during the 1930s and 1950s, but was unsuccessful. Following the success of The Little Mermaid (1989), Walt Disney Pictures decided to adapt the fairy tale, which Richard Purdum originally conceived as a non-musical period drama. After seeing a test reel, Disney chairman Jeffrey Katzenberg scrapped Purdum's idea and ordered that the film be a musical similar to The Little Mermaid instead. Lyricist Howard Ashman and composer Alan Menken wrote the film's songs. Ashman, who additionally served as the film's executive producer, died of AIDS-related complications six months before the film's release, and the film is thus dedicated to his memory.

 

Beauty and the Beast premiered as an unfinished film at the New York Film Festival on September 29, 1991, followed by its theatrical release as a completed film at the El Capitan Theatre on November 13. The film grossed $331 million at the box office worldwide on a $25 million budget and received widespread critical acclaim for its romantic narrative, animation (particularly the ballroom scene), characters, and musical numbers. Beauty and the Beast won the Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy, the first animated film to ever win that category. It also became the first animated film to be nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture at the 64th Academy Awards (ultimately losing to The Silence of the Lambs), where it won the Academy Award for Best Original Score and Best Original Song for its title song and received additional nominations for Best Original Song and Best Sound. In April 1994, Beauty and the Beast became Disney's first animated film to be adapted into a Broadway musical, which ran until 2007.

 

An IMAX version of the film was released in 2002 and included the new song "Human Again", originally an eight-minute storyboarded musical sequence ultimately replaced with "Something There", but later revised in the 1994 musical as a five-minute piece. That same year, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress for being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".  After the success of the 3D re-release of The Lion King, the film was reissued in 3D in 2012.  A live-action adaptation of the film directed by Bill Condon was released on March 17, 2017. In 2014, Time magazine ranked Beauty and the Beast as the greatest film of the Disney Renaissance and one of the greatest animated films of all time.

 

 

Beauty and the Beast is a 2017 American musical romantic fantasy film directed by Bill Condon from a screenplay by Stephen Chbosky and Evan Spiliotopoulos. Produced by Walt Disney Pictures and Mandeville Films, the film is a live-action adaptation of Disney's 1991 animated film of the same name, itself an adaptation of Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont's 1756 version of the fairy tale. Starring Emma Watson and Dan Stevens as the eponymous Belle and the Beast, the film features an ensemble and choir cast including Luke Evans, Kevin Kline, Josh Gad, Ewan McGregor, Stanley Tucci, Audra McDonald, Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Ian McKellen, and Emma Thompson.

 

A live-action Beauty and the Beast remake was first announced in April 2014, with Condon hired to direct it; Watson, Stevens, Evans and the rest of the cast signed on between January and April 2015. Filming took place primarily at Shepperton Studios in England from May to August 2015. With an estimated budget of around $255 million, it is one of the most expensive films ever made.

 

Beauty and the Beast premiered at Spencer House in London on February 23, 2017, and was theatrically released in the United States in standard, Disney Digital 3-D, RealD 3D, IMAX, and IMAX 3D formats, along with Dolby Cinema on March 17, 2017.  The film received generally positive reviews from critics, who praised its cast, songs, and visual detail.  It grossed over $1.2 billion worldwide, becoming the second highest-grossing film of 2017 and the tenth-highest-grossing film of all time. The film received several accolades, including two nominations at the 90th Academy Awards, four nominations at the 23rd Critics' Choice Awards, and two nominations at the 71st British Academy Film Awards. A spin-off television series, Little Town, was in development for Disney+, but has been put on hold.

Opening Credits; Introduction (2.27); Background History (15.24); Beauty and the Beast (1991) Trailer (19.47); Original Thoughts (21.27); Let's Rate (49.53); Introducing a Remake (53.54); Beauty and the Beast (2017) Trailer (56.29); Lights, Camera, Action (58.48); How Many Stars (1:48.23); End Credits (1:55.29); Closing Credits (1:56.54)

Opening Credits– Beauty and the Beast Prologue by Alan Menken.  Copyright 1991 Disney Records. All rights reserved

 

Closing Credits:  Beauty and the Beast by Marilyn Martin.  Taken from the self titled album Marilyn Martin.  Copyright 1986 Atlantic Records. 

Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 

 

All rights reserved.  Used by Kind Permission.

 

All songs available through Amazon Music.

October 2023

Is This Even Normal?

BOOK TO SCREEN:  Once Upon A Time

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Coraline  is a dark fantasy horror children's novel by British author Neil Gaiman. Gaiman started writing Coraline in 1990, and it was published in 2002 by Bloomsbury and HarperCollins. It was awarded the 2003 Hugo Award for Best Novella, the 2003 Nebula Award for Best Novel, and the 2002 Bram Stoker Award for Best Work for Young Readers. The Guardian ranked Coraline #82 in its list of 100 Best Books of the 21st Century. It was adapted as a 2009 stop-motion animated film, directed by Henry Selick under the same name.

 

Coraline is a 2009 American stop-motion animated dark fantasy horror film written and directed by Henry Selick and based on Neil Gaiman's novella of the same name. Produced by Laika as the studio's first feature film, it features the voice talents of Dakota Fanning, Teri Hatcher, Jennifer Saunders, Dawn French, Keith David, John Hodgman, Robert Bailey Jr., and Ian McShane. The film tells the story of its titular character discovering an idealized parallel universe behind a secret door in her new home, unaware that it contains a dark and sinister secret.

 

Just as Gaiman was finishing his novella in 2002, he met Selick and invited him to make a film adaptation, as Gaiman was a fan of Selick's The Nightmare Before Christmas and James and the Giant Peach. When Selick thought that a direct adaptation would lead to "maybe a 47-minute movie", the screenplay had some expansions, like the introduction of Wybie, who was not present in the original novel. Selick invited Japanese illustrator Tadahiro Uesugi to become the concept artist upon discovering his work when looking for a design away from that of most animation. His biggest influences were on the colour palette, which was muted in reality and more colourful in the Other World, similar to The Wizard of Oz. To capture stereoscopy for the 3D release, the animators shot each frame from two slightly apart camera positions. Production of the stop-motion animation feature took place at a warehouse in Hillsboro, Oregon. Bruno Coulais composed the film's musical score.

 

The film was theatrically released in the United States on February 6, 2009 by Focus Features after a world premiere at the Portland International Film Festival on February 5, and received critical acclaim. The film grossed $16.85 million during its opening weekend, ranking third at the box office, and by the end of its run had grossed over $124 million worldwide, making it the third highest-grossing stop-motion film of all time after Chicken Run and Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit. The film won Annie Awards for Best Music in an Animated Feature Production, Best Character Design in an Animated Feature Production and Best Production Design in an Animated Feature Production and received nominations for an Academy Award for Best Animated Feature and a Golden Globe Award for Best Animated Feature Film. It has since developed a cult following in the years since its release.

Opening Credits; Introduction (1.20); Background History (9.33); Coraline Plot Synopsis (10.37); Book Thoughts (12.26); Let's Rate (31.40); Introducing a Film (33.14); Coraline Film Trailer (36.35); Lights, Camera, Action (38.55); How Many Stars (1:00.24); End Credits (1:02.03); Closing Credits (1:03.30)

Opening Credits– Epidemic Sound – Copyright . All rights reserved

 

Closing Credits:  Dollhouse by Melanie Martinez.  Taken from the album Cry Baby.  Copyright 2015 Atlantic Records.

Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 

 

All rights reserved.  Used by Kind Permission.

 

All songs available through Amazon Music.

BATMAN:  The Animated Series

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Paging The Crime Doctor

 

Dr Matthew Thorne, a formerly respectable surgeon who lost his license after sheltering his brother Rupert Thorne from the police and once a friend of Dr Thomas Wayne and Leslie Thompkins, is reduced to acting as a mob doctor.  When Rupert is critically injured, his brother coerces Leslie to assist with the surgery.  But the recovering mob boss wants no witnesses, and Mathew is forced to decide where his real loyalties lie. 

 

Zatanna

 

Zatanna was the daughter of Zatara, an excellent magician who taught Bruce Wayne, under the name of “John Smith”, everything he knows about escape artistry and “magic”.  Zatara was a world renowned magician and was considered quite possibly the best in his field.  He also passed on his teachings to his only child, a daughter named Zatanna.  Zatanna gained her talent from her father and became an excellent magician herself.

 

She also had a romantic relationship with Bruce, despite never knowing his real name.  Zatanna always had close ties with Bruce Wayne, although Bruce was cautious of this relationship by never giving her his real name.

 

Years later in a show in Gotham City, she made the contents of the Gotham Mint disappear to show up magic debunker Montaque Kane.  Unfortunately for her, Kane had not only seen through her trick, but was a thief, and stole the money while framing her for the crime.  She was freed from custody and assisted Batman in bringing Kane to justice.

 

After their collaboration with Batman, she eventually recognised him as her old friend from long ago.  she then told Batman that Zatara, who had passed away by this stage would have been proud of him, putting his arts to use in fighting crime.

 

 

The Mechanic

 

Thanks to a freak accident during a high-speed chase, the Batmobile is virtually demolished.  After Batman takes the car to his personal mechanic, Earl Cooper, the Penguin makes his move and tampers with the Batmobile, putting it under his control. 

 

 

Harley and Ivy

 

After a failed heist, a frustrated Joker boots Harley Quinn from his gang and to prove her worth to the Clown Prince of Crime, Harley goes solo on her own crimes.  This path eventually leads her to form a partnership with fellow criminal Poison Ivy.  The success of Harley and Ivy as the new “Queens of Crime” doesn’t go unnoticed by The Joker, or Batman, both of whom set out to stop the amazing duo for their own personal reasons, Little do they know, no man can stop Harley and Ivy.

Opening Credits; Introduction (.56); Episode One:  Paging the Crime Doctor (36.20); Episode Two:  Zatana (45.50); Episode Three:  The Mechanic (1:04.50); Episode Four:  Harley and Ivy (1:13.52); Favourite Episode:  (1:52.53); End Credits (1:55.30); Closing Credits (1:56.46)

Opening Credits– Epidemic Sound – Copyright . All rights reserved

 

Closing Credits:  Sisters Are Doin’ It For Themselves by Aretha Franklin and The Eurythmics.  Taken from the album Be Yourself Tonight by The Eurythmics.  Copyright 1985 RCA Records.

Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 

 

All rights reserved.  Used by Kind Permission.

 

All songs available through Amazon Music.

TWO FOR 1:  Dark Families

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Kuntilanak is a 2018 Indonesian horror film directed by Rizal Mantovani and written by Alim Sudio.  The plot revolves around five children who find a mirror in their orphanage. The mirror contains a ghost that kidnaps children and imprisons them inside it.

 

The Hole is a 2009 American 3D dark fantasy horror film directed by Joe Dante and starring Chris Massoglia, Haley Bennett, Nathan Gamble, Bruce Dern, and Teri Polo. The film follows Dane and Lucas Thompson, two brothers who move into their new house in Bensenville with their single mother, Susan. While settling in their new home, Dane and Lucas, along with their new neighbor, Julie Campbell, discover a trap door in the basement, leading to a bottomless pit and, upon opening it, accidentally unleash a supernatural force that manifests itself into any fear of the person who looks into the hole.

Opening Credits; Introduction (1.22); Background History (35.05); Kuntilanak (2018) Film Trailer (35.55); Now We Present (37.06); Let's Rate (1:02.15); Introducing a Film (1:14.57); The Hole (2009) Film Trailer (1: 16.00); Lights, Camera, Action (1:17.36); How Many Stars (1:43.22); End Credits (1:50.51); Closing Credits (1:52.42)

Opening Credits– Epidemic Sound – Copyright . All rights reserved

 

Closing Credits:  Don’t Let The Lights Go Out by Panic At The Disco.  Taken from the album Viva La Vengeance.  Copyright 2022 Fuelled by Ramen and DCD2 Records.

Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 

 

All rights reserved.  Used by Kind Permission.

 

All songs available through Amazon Music.

ANTHOLOGY

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Trick 'r Treat is a 2007 American anthology horror comedy film written and directed by Michael Dougherty and produced by Bryan Singer. The film stars Dylan Baker, Rochelle Aytes, Anna Paquin and Brian Cox. It relates four Halloween horror stories with a common element in them: Sam, a trick-or-treating demon wearing orange footie pajamas with a burlap sack over his head. The character makes an appearance in each of the stories whenever one of the other characters breaks a Halloween tradition.

 

Despite being delayed for two years and having only a limited number of screenings at film festivals, the film received much critical acclaim and has since garnered a strong cult following.

 

Tales of Halloween is a 2015 American comedy horror anthology film consisting of ten interlocking segments, each revolving around the titular holiday. Segments were directed by Neil Marshall, Darren Lynn Bousman, Axelle Carolyn, Lucky McKee, Andrew Kasch, Paul Solet, John Skipp, Adam Gierasch, Jace Anderson, Mike Mendez, Ryan Schifrin, Dave Parker and, in his film debut, Jack Dylan Grazer.

 

The film premiered on July 24, 2015, at the Fantasia International Film Festival, before receiving a limited theatrical release and through video on demand on October 16, 2015, by Epic Pictures.

Opening Credits; Introduction (1.00); Background History (43.50); Trick ‘R Treat (2009) Film Trailer (45.33); Featuring the Presentation (48.07); Let's Rate (1:19.42); Introducing a Film (1:26.34); Tales of Halloween (2015) Film Trailer (1:26.57); Lights, Camera, Action (1:29.02); How Many Stars (2:08.17); End Credits (2:18.01); Closing Credits (2:20.35)

Opening Credits– Epidemic Sound – Copyright . All rights reserved

 

Closing Credits:  Everyday Is Halloween by LVCRFT, From the album V. Copyright 2023 Spooky Never Sleeps

Buy This Track HERE:  Everyday Is Halloween | LVCRFT (bandcamp.com)

Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 

 

All rights reserved.  Used by Kind Permission.

 

All songs available through Amazon Music.

DOCTOR WHO:  The Space Museum/The Chase

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The Space Museum

24 April – 15 May 1965

 

 

The First Doctor (William Hartnell) and his travelling companions Ian Chesterton (William Russell), Barbara Wright (Jacqueline Hill), and Vicki (Maureen O'Brien) arrive in a Space Museum on the planet Xeros, where they seek to change their fate after seeing themselves turned into museum exhibits in the future. They also become entangled in a conflict between the militaristic Moroks who run the museum, and the servile indigenous Xerons who work for them.

The Chase

 

22 May – 26 June 1965

 

 

The First Doctor (William Hartnell) and his companions Ian Chesterton (William Russell), Barbara Wright (Jacqueline Hill), and Vicki (Maureen O'Brien)—to kill them and seize the TARDIS for themselves. The Doctor and companions encounter several characters, including monsters Dracula (Malcolm Rogers) and Frankenstein's monster (John Maxim), human astronaut Steven Taylor (Peter Purves), and an android replica of the Doctor (Edmund Warwick).

Opening Credits; Introduction (.44); Introducing The Space Museum  (4.35); The Space Museum  Plot Synopsis (5.09); Discussing the Episode (7.43); Favourite Moments (12.26); Let's Rate (14.20); Introducing The Chase (16.25); The Chase Plot Synopsis (17.01); Lights, Camera, Action (20.11); How Many Stars (29.19); End Credits (30.37); Closing Credits (32.41)

Opening Credits– Epidemic Sound – Copyright . All rights reserved

 

Closing Credits:  Say Goodbye by S Club 7.  From the album Best:  The Greatest Hits of S Club 7. Copyright 2003 Polydor – 19

Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 

 

All rights reserved.  Used by Kind Permission.

 

All songs available through Amazon Music.

November 2023

We Shall Survive

BOOK TO SCREEN: Once Upon A Time

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Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH is a 1971 children's science fiction/fantasy book by Robert C. O'Brien, with illustrations by Zena Bernstein. The novel was published by the New York City publishing house Atheneum Books.

 

This book was the winner of numerous awards including the 1972 Newbery Medal.   Ten years following its publication, the story was adapted for film as The Secret of NIMH (1982).

 

The novel centres around a colony of escaped lab rats–the rats of NIMH–who live in a technologically sophisticated and literate society mimicking that of humans. They come to the aid of Mrs. Frisby, a widowed field mouse who seeks to protect her children and home from destruction by a farmer’s plow.

 

The rats of NIMH were inspired by the research of John B. Calhoun on mouse and rat population dynamics at the National Institute of Mental Health from the 1940s to the 1960s.

 

After O’Brien’s death in 1973, his daughter Jane Leslie Conly wrote two sequels to Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH.

 

The Secret of NIMH is a 1982 American animated fantasy adventure film directed by Don Bluth in his directorial debut and based on Robert C. O'Brien's 1971 children's novel, Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH. The film features the voices of Elizabeth Hartman, Peter Strauss, Arthur Malet, Dom DeLuise, John Carradine, Derek Jacobi, Hermione Baddeley, and Paul Shenar. It was produced by Bluth's production company Don Bluth Productions in association with Aurora Productions.

 

The Secret of NIMH was released in the United States on July 2, 1982, by MGM/UA Entertainment Co. under the United Artists label. It was praised by critics for its elegant and painstakingly detailed animation, compelling characters, and deep and mature plot, and won a Saturn Award for Best Animated Film of 1982. Though only a moderate success at the box office, it turned a solid profit through home video and overseas releases. It was followed in 1998 by a direct-to-video sequel, The Secret of NIMH 2: Timmy to the Rescue, which was made without Bluth's involvement or input and met with poor reception. In 2015, a live-action/computer-animated remake was reported to be in the works. A television series adaptation is also in development by the Fox Corporation.

Opening Credits; Introduction (1.21); Background History (4.50); Mrs Frisby and the Rats of NIMH Plot Synopsis (6.15); Book Thoughts (11.37); Let's Rate (42.18); Introducing a Film (44.01); Secret of NIMH (1982) Film Trailer (46.00); Lights, Camera, Action (48.33); How Many Stars (1:33.30); End Credits (1.35.41); Closing Credits (1:37.18)

Opening Credits– Epidemic Sound – Copyright . All rights reserved

 

Closing Credits:  Flying Dreams (from The Secret of NIMH) by Kenny Loggins featuring Olivia Newton-John.  Taken from the album More Songs from Pooh’s Corner.  Copyright 2000 Sony Records. 

Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 

 

All rights reserved.  Used by Kind Permission.

 

All songs available through Amazon Music.

BATMAN:  The Animated Series

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Shadow of the Bat Part 1

 

When Commissioner Gordon is framed for taking bribes from Rupert Thorne, his daughter Barbara pleads with Batman to show up at a rally being put on in the commissioner’s behalf.  But when Batman disappears after finding the person behind the frame-up.  Barbara takes matters into her own hands as Batgirl.

 

Shadow of the Bat Part 2

 

Batman has been captured by Two-Face and his gang, leaving Robin to do the investigating behind Commissioner Gordan’s framing.  However, Robin will find an unusual partner in Batgirl, who is also on the path to clear her father’s name and the information she has uncovered about acting commissioner Gil Mason will help them on their quest. 

 

Blind As A Bat

 

In the course of stealing a high-tech military aircraft called the Raven, the Penguin injures Bruce Wayne, causing temporary blindness.  But Batman refuses to sit back while Penguin holds the city hostage, and dons and experimental headset that will allow him to “see” while the battery holds out.

 

In an intense sky battle that ends with a crash landing, Batman manages to foil the Penquin’s scheme – but his faltering gear leaves him blind once more, attempting to hear his way through a violent confrontation with a muscle-bound good and ultimately the fowl fiend himself.

 

His Silcone Soul

 

When a Batman impersonator appears in Gotham City, the real Batman deduces that Karl Rossum is somehow involved and confronts the inventor.  The other Batman, a duplicate, then shows up and a battle between the two takes place.  After the duplicate Batman escapes, it begins its campaign to recreate H.A.R.D.A.C’s goals of a robotic society.

Opening Credits; Introduction (.56); Shadow of the Bat Part 1 & 2 (41.51); Blind As A Bat (55.54); His Silicon Soul (1:14.49); Favourite Episode (1:31.05); End Credits (1:33.14); Closing Credits (1:35.11)

Opening Credits– Epidemic Sound – Copyright . All rights reserved

 

Closing Credits:  She’s A Lady by Tom Jones.  Taken from the album Tom Jones Sings She’s A Lady.  Copyright 1971 Decca Records/Parrot Records

Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 

 

All rights reserved.  Used by Kind Permission.

 

All songs available through Amazon Music.

TWO FOR 1:  Dark Families

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The Breadwinner is a 2017 animated drama film from Irish animation studio Cartoon Saloon directed by Nora Twomey. Based on the best-selling novel by Deborah Ellis, the film was an international co-production between Canada, the Republic of Ireland and Luxembourg, and received a limited release on 17 November 2017.

 

The film had its world premiere at the 2017 Toronto International Film Festival in September. The Breadwinner received a nomination for Best Animated Feature at the 90th Academy Awards but lost to Coco.

 

The House with a Clock in Its Walls is a 2018 American fantasy comedy film directed by Eli Roth, based on the 1973 novel of the same name by John Bellairs. It stars Jack Black, Cate Blanchett, Owen Vaccaro, Renée Elise Goldsberry, Sunny Suljic, and Kyle MacLachlan. The film follows a young boy, Lewis, who is sent to live with his uncle, Jonathan, in a creaky, old house. He soon learns it was previously inhabited by a villainous warlock. Universal Pictures released the film in the United States on September 21, 2018. It was a box office success, grossing over $131 million worldwide and received mostly positive reviews from critics who largely praised the cast, but said the film did not fully live up to its potential.

Opening Credits; Introduction (1.22; Background History (37.50); The Breadwinner (2017) Trailer (38.37); Discussing Our Opening Feature (40.16); Let's Rate (1:44.34); Introducing Our Second Presentation (1:45.53); The House With The Clock In Its Walls (2018) Trailer (1:47.00); Lights, Camera, Action (1:49.06); How Many Stars (2:26.56); End Credits (2:36.02); Closing Credits (2:37.57)

Opening Credits– Epidemic Sound – Copyright . All rights reserved

 

Closing Credits:  I Still Believe Me by Deborah Allen and Erica Gimble.  From the album Kids From Fame.  Copyright 1982 RCA Records

Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 

 

All rights reserved.  Used by Kind Permission.

 

All songs available through Amazon Music.

ANTHOLOGY

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The Uncanny is a 1977 British-Canadian anthology horror film directed by Denis Héroux, written by Michel Parry, and starring Peter Cushing, Donald Pleasence, Ray Milland, Joan Greenwood, Donald Pilon, Samantha Eggar, and John Vernon.

 

Although it is similar to the horror anthologies released by Amicus Productions and could be mistaken as one, it was actually distributed by The Rank Organisation. However, the co-producer was Milton Subotsky of Amicus.

 

Cat's Eye (also known as Stephen King's Cat's Eye) is a 1985 American anthology horror thriller film directed by Lewis Teague and written by Stephen King. It comprises three stories, "Quitters, Inc.", "The Ledge", and "General". The first two are adaptations of short stories in King's 1978 Night Shift collection, and the third is unique to the film. The three stories are connected only by the presence of a traveling cat, which plays an incidental role in the first two and is a major character of the third.

 

Its cast includes Drew Barrymore, James Woods, Alan King, Robert Hays and Candy Clark.

Opening Credits; Introduction (2.31); Background History (28.49); Whatever Happened To Cousin Charlotte Plot Synopsis (29.44); Book Thoughts(34.10); Let's Rate (49.13); Introducing a Film (57.07); Hush Hush Sweet Charlotte Film Trailer (58.31); Lights, Camera, Action (1:01.22); How Many Stars (1:57.17); End Credits (2:08.03); Closing Credits (2:09.49)

Opening Credits– Epidemic Sound – Copyright . All rights reserved

 

Closing Credits:  Deadly Valentine by LVCRFT, Scary Ana Grande, Deja Vudu & Count Tracukla.  From the album Deadly Valentine. Copyright 2022 Spooky Never Sleeps

Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 

 

All rights reserved.  Used by Kind Permission.

 

All songs available through Amazon Music.

DOCTOR WHO:  The Time Meddler/Galaxy 4

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The Time Meddler

3 – 24 July 1965

 

Set in Northumbria in 1066, before the Battle of Stamford Bridge, the serial features the time traveller the First Doctor (William Hartnell) and his companions Vicki (Maureen O'Brien) and Steven Taylor (Peter Purves) as they attempt to outwit the time traveller the Monk (Peter Butterworth), who is plotting to change the course of European history by wiping out King Harald Hardrada's Viking invasion fleet, leaving Harold Godwinson and the Saxon soldiers fresh to defeat William of Normandy and the Norman soldiers at the Battle of Hastings.

Galaxy 4

 

11 September – 2 October 1965

 

The First Doctor (William Hartnell) and his travelling companions Vicki (Maureen O'Brien) and Steven (Peter Purves) arrive on an arid planet, where they encounter the beautiful but dangerous Drahvins and the hideous but friendly Rills, two crash-landed species in conflict with one another. Both species wish to escape as the planet is set to explode in two dawns, but the Drahvin leader Maaga (Stephanie Bidmead) only wants her people to make it out alive.

Opening Credits; Introduction (.44); Background History (7.15); The Time Meddler Synopsis (8.15); Discussing the Story (12.16); Let's Rate (24.36); Introducing Our Next Story 25.11); Galaxy 4 Synopsis (25.52); Lights, Camera, Action (28.46); How Many Stars (39.07); End Credits (39.51); Closing Credits (41.05)

Opening Credits– Epidemic Sound – Copyright . All rights reserved

 

Closing Credits:  Female of the Species by SPACE  Taken from the album Spiders.  Copyright 1996 GUT Records

Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 

 

All rights reserved.  Used by Kind Permission.

 

All songs available through Amazon Music.

December 2023

We Interrupt Our Programme

BOOK TO SCREEN:  Once Upon A Time

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Auntie Mame: An Irreverent Escapade is a 1955 novel by American author Patrick Dennis chronicling the madcap adventures of a boy, Patrick, growing up as the ward of his Aunt Mame Dennis, the sister of his dead father.

 

The book is often described as having been inspired by Dennis' real-life eccentric aunt, Marion Tanner, whose life and outlook mirrored those of Mame, but Dennis denied the connection. The novel was a runaway bestseller, setting records on the New York Times bestseller list, with more than 2 million copies in print during its initial publication. It became the basis of a stage play, a film, a stage musical, and a film musical.

 

In 1958, Dennis wrote a sequel titled Around the World with Auntie Mame.

 

Auntie Mame is a 1958 American Technirama Technicolor comedy film based on the 1955 novel of the same name by Edward Everett Tanner III (under the pseudonym Patrick Dennis) and its 1956 theatrical adaptation by Jerome Lawrence and Robert Edwin Lee. This film version stars Rosalind Russell and was directed by Morton DaCosta. It is not to be confused with a musical version of the same story that appeared on Broadway in 1966 and was later made into a 1974 film, Mame, starring Lucille Ball as the title character.

Opening Credits; Introduction (2.21); Background History (15.30); Auntie Mame by Patrick Dennis Plot Synopsis (17.01); Book Thoughts (21.56); Let's Rate (39.06); Introducing a Film (41.18); Auntie Mame (1958) Film Trailer (42.25); Lights, Camera, Action (45.31); How Many Stars (1:13.28); End Credits (1.18.01); Closing Credits (1:20.07)

Opening Credits– Jingle Bells by Ella Fitzgerald.  Taken from the album Ella’s Swinging Christmas.  Copyright 1960 Verve Records.  All rights reserved.

 

Incidental Music:  Auntie Mame Original Motion Picture Soundtrack.  Music by Ray Heindorf and His Orchestra.  Copyright 1958 Master Classics Records.

 

 

Closing Credits:  We Need A Little Christmas by Angela Lansbury, Frankie Michals, Sab Saminino- Original Broadway Cast.  From the album Mame Original Broadway Recording.  Copyright 1966 Columbia Master Works Records. 

Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 

 

All rights reserved.  Used by Kind Permission.

 

All songs available through Amazon Music.

BATMAN:  The Animated Series

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The Demon’s Quest Part 1

 

When Robin is mysteriously abducted from his college campus, Batman begins a fruitless search…until he is astounded by the sudden appearance in the Batcave of Ra’s Al Ghul.  Ra’s quickly reveals that his daughter, Talia, has been abducted under circumstances similar to Robin’s, suggesting that the same persons are responsible.  So begins an uneasy truce between the Batman and ‘The Demon’.

 

The Demon’s Quest Part 2

 

After learning the secret of Ra’s al Ghul’s immortality, Batman and Robin escape from a death trap and follow the only clue they have to stop Ra’s plans – the world ‘Orpheus’.  After discovering the ‘Orpheus’ is Ra’s private satellite that will orbit over the Sahara, the duo travel to Demon’s desert stronghold.  There, Batman learns that the satellite is actually a weapon which will explosively destroy all the Lazarus Pits simultaneously, throughout the world, changing the eco-system and returning Earth to is original natural state.

 

Fire From Olympus

 

Believing himself to be the reincarnation of the Greek God Zeus, mad shipping magnate Maxie Zeus hijacks an experimental electron cannon.  Mounting the weapon atop his penthouse, Maxie plans to rain ‘lightning bolts’ down on the wicked mortals of Gotham City.

 

Read My Lips

 

Gotham Police are baffled by a series of crimes executed with clockwork-like precision.  Batman investigates and discovers that the crimes are planned by a mob boss known as Scarface.  He traces Scarface to his lair – a deserted mannequin warehouse – and discovers, to his astonishment, that the crime czar is a wooden dummy, manipulated by a mild-mannered man called the Ventriloquist mortals of Gotham City.

Opening Credits; Introduction (2.49); Episode One:  Demon’s Quest Part 1 & 2 (24.06); Episode Two:  Fire From Olympus (50.47); Episode Three:  Read My Lips (1:01.32); Favourite Episode (1:18.07); I End Credits (1:30.32); Closing Credits (1:32.16)

Opening Credits– Donde Esta Santa Clause by Augie Roos.  Taken from the album Maybe This Christmas Too.  Copyright 1958 Ragtime Music

 

Closing Credits:  Do You Hear What I Hear/You Really Got Me by Bobby Lloyd and the Skeltons.  Taken from the album A Christmas Party at Eddie G.  Copyright 1996. Strikin’ It Rich Records. 

Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 

 

All rights reserved.  Used by Kind Permission.

 

All songs available through Amazon Music.

TWO FOR 1:  Dark Families

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The Music Man is a 1962 American musical film directed and produced by Morton DaCosta, based on Meredith Willson's 1957 Broadway musical of the same name, which DaCosta also directed. Robert Preston reprises the title role from the stage version, starring alongside Shirley Jones, Buddy Hackett, Hermione Gingold, Ronny Howard, and Paul Ford.

 

Released by Warner Bros. on June 19, 1962, the film was one of the biggest hits of the year and was widely acclaimed by critics. It was nominated for six Academy Awards, including Best Picture, with composer Ray Heindorf winning Best Music, Scoring of Music, Adaptation or Treatment. The film also won the Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy, and Preston and Jones were both nominated in their respective acting categories. In 2005, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".

 

Island of Love is a 1963 American comedy film directed by Morton DaCosta and written by David R. Schwartz. The film stars Robert Preston, Tony Randall, Giorgia Moll, Walter Matthau, Betty Bruce and Vassili Lambrinos. The film was released by Warner Bros. on June 12, 1963.

Opening Credits; Introduction (1.22); Background History (37.48); The Music Man (1962) Film Trailer (38.58); Our Feature Presentation (39.47); Let's Rate (1:07.13); Introducing Our Next Feature (1:11.47); Island of Love (1963) Background Footage (1:12.40; Lights, Camera, Action (1:14.05); How Many Stars (2:23.54); End Credits (2:33.51); Closing Credits (2:35.10)

Opening Credits– Epidemic Sound – Copyright . All rights reserved

 

Closing Credits:  Once Upon A Christmas Song by Peter Kay introducing Geraldine McQueen.  Copyright 2008 Peter Kay and Gary Barlow

Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 

 

All rights reserved.  Used by Kind Permission.

 

All songs available through Amazon Music.

ANTHOLOGY

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A Christmas Horror Story is a 2015 Canadian anthology horror film directed by Grant Harvey, Steven Hoban, and Brett Sullivan.  It premiered on July 20, 2015, at the Fantasia International Film Festival and had a limited theatrical release on October 2, 2015, along with a VOD release.  The film is a series of interwoven stories tied together by a framework story featuring William Shatner as a radio DJ.

 

 

Tales from the Crypt is a 1972 British horror film directed by Freddie Francis. It is an anthology film consisting of five separate segments, based on stories from EC Comics. It was produced by Amicus Productions and filmed at Shepperton Studios.

 

In the film, five strangers (Joan Collins, Ian Hendry, Robin Phillips, Richard Greene and Nigel Patrick) in a crypt encounter the mysterious Crypt Keeper (Ralph Richardson), who makes each person in turn foresee the possible manner of their death. It is one of several Amicus horror anthologies produced during the 1970s.

Opening Credits; Introduction (2.41); Background History (54.21); A Christmas Horror Story (2015) Trailer (55.24); Take One (57.13); Let's Rate (1:38.51); Introducing a Film (1:43.14); Tales From the Crypt (1972)  Film Trailer (1:45.07); Lights, Camera, Action (1:47.00); How Many Stars (3:04.06); End Credits (3:08.34); Closing Credits (3:09.45)

Opening Credits– Alex Kashadian – Copyright 2015. All rights reserved

 

Closing Credits:  Elf’s Lament by Barenaked Ladies (featuring Michael Buble).  Taken from the album Barenaked For The Holidays.  Copyright 2004 Desperation Records

Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 

 

All rights reserved.  Used by Kind Permission.

 

All songs available through Amazon Music.

DOCTOR WHO:  Mission To The Unknown/
                             The Myth Makers

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Mission To The Unknown

 

9 October 1965

 

The only standalone regular episode of the show's original run, it serves as an introduction to the 12-part story The Daleks' Master Plan. It is notable for the complete absence of the regular cast and the TARDIS; it is the only serial in the show's history not to feature the Doctor at all, although William Hartnell was still credited on-screen. The story focuses on Space Security Agent Marc Cory (Edward de Souza) and his attempts to warn Earth of the Daleks' plan to take over the Solar System.

The Myth Makers

 

16 October -  6 November 1965

 

 

Based on Homer's Iliad, the First Doctor (William Hartnell) and his travelling companions Vicki (Maureen O'Brien) and Steven (Peter Purves) land in Troy during the Trojan War. The Doctor is captured by the Greeks and forced to formulate a plan for taking the city, while Steven and Vicki are captured by the Trojans and forced to devise a means of banishing the Greeks; the latter duo meet Katarina (Adrienne Hill), who becomes a companion by the serial's end.

Opening Credits; Introduction (.37); Introduction of Mission To The Unknown (6.28); Mission to the Unknown Synopsis (7.21); Story Thoughts (9.24); Let's Rate (21.30); The Myth Makers Plot Synopsis  (23.49); Lights, Camera, Action (27.15); How Many Stars (34.05); End Credits (36.17); Closing Credits (37.15)

Opening Credits– Epidemic Sound – Copyright . All rights reserved

 

Closing Credits:  Snoopy’s Christmas vs The Red Baron by The Royal Guardsmen.  Taken from the Album Snoopy and His Friends.  Copyright 1967 Laurie Records.

Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 

 

All rights reserved.  Used by Kind Permission.

 

All songs available through Amazon Music.

MAKE/REMAKE

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The Lion King is a 1994 American animated musical drama film produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures. The 32nd Disney animated feature film and the fifth produced during the Disney Renaissance, it is inspired by William Shakespeare's Hamlet with elements from the Biblical stories of Joseph and Moses and Disney's 1942 film Bambi. The film was directed by Roger Allers and Rob Minkoff (in their feature directorial debuts) and produced by Don Hahn, from a screenplay written by Irene Mecchi, Jonathan Roberts, and Linda Woolverton. The film features an ensemble voice cast that includes Matthew Broderick, James Earl Jones, Jeremy Irons, Jonathan Taylor Thomas, Nathan Lane, Ernie Sabella, Rowan Atkinson, and Robert Guillaume. Its original songs were written by composer Elton John and lyricist Tim Rice, with a score by Hans Zimmer.

 

Set in a kingdom of lions in Africa, The Lion King tells the story of Simba (Swahili for lion), a lion cub who is to succeed his father, Mufasa, as King of the Pride Lands; however, after his paternal uncle Scar kills Mufasa to seize the throne, Simba is tricked into believing he was responsible for his father's death and flees into exile. After growing up in the company of the carefree outcasts Timon and Pumbaa, Simba receives valuable perspective from his childhood friend, Nala, and his shaman, Rafiki, before returning to challenge Scar to end his tyranny and take his place in the Circle of Life as the rightful king.

 

The Lion King was released on June 15, 1994, receiving critical acclaim for its music, story, themes, and animation. With an initial worldwide gross of $763 million, it finished its theatrical run as the highest-grossing film of 1994 and the second-highest-grossing film of all time, behind Jurassic Park (1993). It also held the title of being the highest-grossing animated film, until it was overtaken by Finding Nemo (2003). The film remains the highest-grossing traditionally animated film of all time, as well as the best-selling film on home video, having sold over 55 million copies worldwide. It received two Academy Awards, as well as the Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy.

 

The film has led to many derived works, such as a Broadway adaptation in 1997; two direct-to-video follow-ups—the sequel, The Lion King II: Simba's Pride (1998), and the prequel/parallel, The Lion King 1½ (2004); two television series, Timon and Pumbaa and The Lion Guard; and a photorealistic remake in 2019, which also became the highest-grossing animated film at the time of its release. In 2016, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".  The Lion King is the first Disney film to have been dubbed in Zulu, the only African language aside from Arabic to have been used for a feature-length Disney dub.

 

 

The Lion King is a 2019 American musical drama film directed and co-produced by Jon Favreau, written by Jeff Nathanson, and produced by Walt Disney Pictures and Fairview Entertainment. It is a photorealistic computer-animated remake of Disney's traditionally animated 1994 film of the same name. The film stars the voices of Donald Glover, Seth Rogen, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Alfre Woodard, Billy Eichner, John Kani, John Oliver, Florence Kasumba, Eric André, Keegan-Michael Key, JD McCrary, Shahadi Wright Joseph, with Beyoncé Knowles-Carter, and James Earl Jones reprising his role from the original film. The plot follows Simba, a young lion who must embrace his role as the rightful king of his homeland following the murder of his father, Mufasa, at the hands of his uncle, Scar.

 

Plans for a remake of 1994's The Lion King were confirmed in September 2016 with Favreau attached to directed following box office successes for Disney remakes such as The Jungle Book (2016), which was also directed by Favreau. Disney hired Nathanson to write the screenplay in October 2016. Favreau was inspired by certain roles of characters in the Broadway adaptation and developed upon elements of the original film's story. Much of the main cast signed in early 2017, and principal photography began in mid-2017 on a blue screen stage in Los Angeles. The "virtual-reality tools" utilized in The Jungle Book's cinematography were used to a greater degree during filming of The Lion King. Composers Hans Zimmer, Elton John, and lyricist Tim Rice, all of whom worked on the original's soundtrack, returned to compose the score alongside Knowles-Carter, who assisted John in the reworking of the soundtrack and wrote a new song for the film, titled "Spirit", which she also performed. The film serves as the final credit for editor Mark Livolsi, and it is dedicated to his memory. With an estimated budget of around $260 million, The Lion King is one of the most expensive films ever made.

 

The Lion King premiered in Hollywood on July 9, 2019, and was theatrically released in the United States on July 19, 2019, in the Dolby Cinema, RealD 3D and IMAX formats. It has grossed over $1.6 billion worldwide during its theatrical run, breaking several box-office records, including overtaking Frozen to become the highest-grossing animated film of all time. It also became the seventh highest-grossing film of all time and the second-highest-grossing film of 2019. The Lion King received mixed reviews from critics, with praise for its visual effects, musical score, and vocal performances (particularly Rogen and Eichner), but criticism for its lack of originality and facial emotion on the characters. The film received nominations for Best Animated Feature Film and Original Song categories at the 77th Golden Globe Awards and 25th Critics' Choice Awards. It was also nominated at 73rd British Academy Film Awards and 92nd Academy Awards, both for visual effects. A prequel film, titled Mufasa: The Lion King, is set for release on July 5, 2024, with Barry Jenkins attached to direct.

Opening Credits; Introduction (.37); Background History (1:02.08); The Lion King (19940 Trailer (1;05.30); The Original (1:06.41); Let's Rate (1:51.58); INTERMISSON:  (1:56.58) Introducing a Film (2:07.01); The Lion King (2019) Film Trailer (2:04.06); Lights, Camera, Action (2:05.51); How Many Stars (2:43.21); End Credits (2:58.34); Closing Credits (2:59.34)

Opening Credits– Epidemic Sound – Copyright . All rights reserved.

 

Intermission Music:  He Lives In You (Reprise) – Ensemble – The Lion King, Jason Raize and Tsidii Le Loka.  Taken from the album The Lion King, The Original Broadway Cast Album.  Copyright 1997 Walt Disney Records.  .

 

Closing Credits:  Shadowlands by Shadowland · Heather Headley · Tsidii Le Loka · Ensemble - The Lion King.  Taken from The Lion King, The Original Broadway Cast Album.  Copyright 1997 Walt Disney Records. 

Interval Music:  The Lion King Original Broadway Cast.  Copyright 1997 Walt Disney Records.

Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 

 

All rights reserved.  Used by Kind Permission.

 

All songs available through Amazon Music.

January 2024

Death And Politics

BOOK TO FILM:  Once Upon A Time

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Watership Down is an adventure novel by English author Richard Adams, published by Rex Collings Ltd of London in 1972. Set in Hampshire in southern England, the story features a small group of rabbits. Although they live in their natural wild environment, with burrows, they are anthropomorphised, possessing their own culture, language, proverbs, poetry, and mythology. Evoking epic themes, the novel follows the rabbits as they escape the destruction of their warren and seek a place to establish a new home (the hill of Watership Down), encountering perils and temptations along the way.

 

Watership Down was Richard Adams' debut novel. It was rejected by several publishers before Collings accepted the manuscript; the published book then won the annual Carnegie Medal (UK), annual Guardian Prize (UK), and other book awards. The novel was adapted into an animated feature film in 1978 and, from 1999 to 2001, an animated children's television series. In 2018, a drama of the story was made, which both aired in the UK and was made available on Netflix.

 

Adams completed a sequel almost 25 years later, in 1996, Tales from Watership Down, constructed as a collection of 19 short stories about El-ahrairah and the rabbits of the Watership Down warren.

 

 

Watership Down is a 1978 British animated adventure-drama film, written, produced and directed by Martin Rosen and based on the 1972 novel by Richard Adams.  It was financed by a consortium of British financial institutions and was distributed by Cinema International Corporation in the United Kingdom. Released on 19 October 1978, the film was an immediate success and it became the sixth-most popular film of 1979 at the UK box office.

 

It features the voices of John Hurt, Richard Briers, Harry Andrews, Simon Cadell, Nigel Hawthorne and Roy Kinnear, among others, and was the last film work of Zero Mostel, as the voice of Kehaar the gull. The musical score was by Angela Morley and Malcolm Williamson. Art Garfunkel's hit song "Bright Eyes" was written by songwriter Mike Batt. It has garnered a cult following.

Opening Credits; Introduction (1.21); Background History (20.15); Watership Down Plot Synopsis (21.57); Book Thoughts (29.16); Let's Rate (50.29); Introducing a Film (52.51); Watership Down Film Trailer (1978) (56.13); Lights, Camera, Action (59.36); How Many Stars (1:40.44); End Credits (1:44.27); Closing Credits (1:45.25)

Opening Credits– Epidemic Sound – Copyright . All rights reserved

 

Closing Credits:  Bright Eyes from Watership Down by Art Garfunkel.  Taken from the album Fate for Breakfast.  Copyright 1978 Columbia Records. 

 

Incidental Music:  Music from Watership Down by Angela Morley.  Available on the Watership Down 1978 Original Motion Picture Soundtrack.  Copyright 1978 Vocation Records.

Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 

 

All rights reserved.  Used by Kind Permission.

 

All songs available through Amazon Music.

BATMAN:  The Animated Series

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The Worry Men

 

Wealthy socialite Veronica Vreeland returns from Central America bringing tiny handmade dolls for all her friends.  According to native legend, once placed under a pillow the dolls do the sleeper’s worrying for them.  Unknown to Veronica or her guests, each of the dolls contains a tiny microchip which plants hypnotic suggestions inside the sleeper’s brains, even Bruce’s. 

 

Sideshow

 

Enroute to an upstate prison, Killer Croc escapes and leads Batman on a dangerous chase through the wilderness.  After throwing Batman temporarily off his trail, the reptile-man takes refuge with a group0 of retired circus freaks and convinces them to help him.  When Batman arrives, Croc and the freaks band together to capture him. 

 

A Bullet For Bullock

 

Someone has put a hit out on Gotham’s toughest cop, Harvey Bullock.  After surviving several near misses, Bullock realises he has no choice but to reluctantly ask Batman to help him discover who is behind the murder attempts.  During their investigation Bullock learns that his gruff and mean-spirited manner has created enemies in the unlikeliest of people. 

 

Trial

 

Gotham’s deadliest criminals, The Joker, Two-Faced, Mad Hatter, The Ventriloquist, Harley Quinn, Poison Ivy among many others, kidnap Batman and put him on trial in Arkham Asylum.  The Dark Knight’s only hope rests with District Attorney Janet Van Dorn who, despite her anti-Batman stance, is forced to defend the Caped Crusader’s life as well as her own. 

Opening Credits; Introduction (.56); Episode One:  The Worry Men (49.50); Episode Two:  Sideshow (59.22); Episode Three:  A Bullet For Bollocks (1:08.26); Episode Four:  The Trial (1:15.15); Favourite Episode (1:20.40); End Credits (1:33.20); Closing Credits (1:34.03)

Opening Credits– Epidemic Sound – Copyright . All rights reserved

 

Closing Credits:  Let It Go by Luba.  From the album 9 ½ Weeks Motion Picture Soundtrack.  Copyright 1986 Capitol Records

Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 

 

All rights reserved.  Used by Kind Permission.

 

All songs available through Amazon Music.

TWO FOR 1:  Dark Families

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The Iron Giant is a 1999 American animated science fiction film produced by Warner Bros. Feature Animation and directed by Brad Bird in his directorial debut. It is based on the 1968 novel The Iron Man by Ted Hughes (which was published in the United States as The Iron Giant) and was written by Tim McCanlies from a story treatment by Bird. The film stars the voices of Jennifer Aniston, Harry Connick Jr., Vin Diesel, James Gammon, Cloris Leachman, John Mahoney, Eli Marienthal, Christopher McDonald, and M. Emmet Walsh. Set during the Cold War in 1957, the film centers on a young boy named Hogarth Hughes, who discovers and befriends a giant alien robot. With the help of a beatnik artist named Dean McCoppin, Hogarth attempts to prevent the U.S. military and Kent Mansley, a paranoid federal agent, from finding and destroying the Giant.

 

The film's development began in 1994 as a musical with the involvement of the Who's Pete Townshend, though the project took root once Bird signed on as director and hired McCanlies to write the screenplay in 1996. The film was animated using traditional animation, with computer-generated imagery used to animate the Iron Giant and other effects. The understaffed crew of the film completed it with half of the time and budget of other animated features. Michael Kamen composed the film's score, which was performed by the Czech Philharmonic.

 

The Iron Giant premiered at Mann's Chinese Theater in Los Angeles on July 31, 1999, and was released in the United States on August 6. The film significantly underperformed at the box office, grossing $31.3 million worldwide against a production budget of $50 million, which was blamed on Warner Bros.' unusually poor marketing campaign and skepticism towards animated film production following the poor critical reception and box office failure of Quest for Camelot in the preceding year. Despite this, the film was praised for its story, animation, characters, the portrayal of the title character and the voice performances of Aniston, Connick, Diesel, Mahoney, Marienthal, and McDonald. The film was nominated for several awards, winning nine Annie Awards out of 15 nominations. Through home video releases and television syndication, the film gathered a cult following and is widely regarded as a modern animated classic, and one of the greatest animated films ever made. In 2015, an extended, remastered version of the film was re-released theatrically and on home video the following year.

 

 

Monster House is a 2006 American computer-animated haunted house film directed by Gil Kenan in his directorial debut and written by Dan Harmon, Rob Schrab and Pamela Pettler, about a neighborhood being terrorized by a sentient haunted house during Halloween. The film features the voices of Mitchel Musso, Sam Lerner, Spencer Locke, Steve Buscemi, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Kevin James, Nick Cannon, Jason Lee, Fred Willard, Jon Heder, Catherine O'Hara, and Kathleen Turner, as well as human characters being animated using live action motion capture animation, which was previously used in The Polar Express (2004). It was Sony's first computer animated film produced by Sony Pictures Imageworks.

 

Produced by Robert Zemeckis' ImageMovers, Steven Spielberg's Amblin Entertainment (marking their first theatrically released fully animated film since Balto) and Relativity Media (their first animated film), the film was released theatrically by Columbia Pictures on July 21, 2006. It received generally positive reviews from critics and grossed $142 million worldwide against a $75 million budget. Monster House received a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature but lost to Happy Feet.

Opening Credits; Introduction (1.23); Background History (28.13); The Iron Giant (1999) Trailer (30.06); Our Thoughts (32.33); Let's Rate (49.09); Introducing Our Second Feature (53.21); Monster House (2006) Film Trailer (55.09); Lights, Camera, Action (57.33); How Many Stars (1:15.07); End Credits (1:17.50); Closing Credits (1:18.22)

Opening Credits– Epidemic Sound – Copyright . All rights reserved

 

Closing Credits:  Halloween by Siouxsie and the Banshees.  Taken from the album Juju. Copyright 1981 Polydor Records.

 

Incidental Music:  Music from The Iron Giant by Michael Kamen. Taken from the album:  The Iron Giant – Original Motion Picture Soundtrack.  Copyright 1999 Rhino Records.

 

Music from Monster House by Douglas Pipes.  Taken from the album:  Monster House – Original Motion Picture Soundtrack. Copyright 2006 Varese Sarabande

Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 

 

All rights reserved.  Used by Kind Permission.

 

All songs available through Amazon Music.

ANTHOLOGY

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Sin City (also known as Frank Miller's Sin City) is a 2005 American neo-noir crime anthology film produced and directed by Robert Rodriguez and Frank Miller. It is based on Miller's graphic novel of the same name.

 

Much of the film is based on the first, third, and fourth books in Miller's original comic series. The Hard Goodbye is about an ex-convict who embarks on a rampage in search of his one-time sweetheart's killer. The Big Fat Kill follows a private investigator  who gets caught in a street war between a group of prostitutes and a group of mercenaries, the police and the mob. That Yellow Bastard focuses on an aging police officer who protects a young woman from a grotesquely disfigured serial killer. The intro and outro of the film are based on the short story "The Customer is Always Right" which is collected in Booze, Broads & Bullets, the sixth book in the comic series.

 

The film stars an ensemble cast led by Jessica Alba, Benicio del Toro, Brittany Murphy, Clive Owen, Mickey Rourke, Bruce Willis, and Elijah Wood, and featuring Alexis Bledel, Powers Boothe, Michael Clarke Duncan, Rosario Dawson, Devon Aoki, Carla Gugino, Rutger Hauer, Jaime King, Michael Madsen, Nick Stahl, and Makenzie Vega among others.

 

Sin City opened to wide critical and commercial success, gathering particular recognition for the film's unique color processing which rendered most of the film in black and white while retaining or adding color for selected objects. The film was screened at the 2005 Cannes Film Festival in competition and won the Technical Grand Prize for the film's "visual shaping". A sequel also directed by Miller and Rodriguez was released in 2014, Sin City: A Dame to Kill For, but failed to match the critical and commercial success of its predecessor.

 

 

Southbound is a 2015 American anthology horror film directed by Radio Silence, Roxanne Benjamin, David Bruckner, and Patrick Horvath. Produced by Brad Miska and Roxanne Benjamin, the film premiered at the 2015 Toronto International Film Festival on September 16, 2015, and was released theatrically on February 5, 2016, in a limited release. The film was included on numerous Best Horror Films of 2016 lists including those by Rolling Stone, BuzzFeed and the Thrillist.

Opening Credits; Introduction (1.00); Background History (4.46); Sin City Film Trailer (2005) (7.22); Exploring Our First Feature (9.04); Let's Rate (50.46); Introducing a Film (53.57); Southbound (2015) Film Trailer (54.46); Lights, Camera, Action (57.06); End Credits (1:12.43); Closing Credits (1:14.20)

Opening Credits– Epidemic Sound – Copyright . All rights reserved

 

Closing Credits:  Road To Nowhere by Talking Heads.  From the album Little Creatures.  Copyright 1985 Sire Records.

Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 

 

Incidental Music:  Music from Sin City Original Motion Picture Soundtrack by  Robert Rodriguez, John Debney and Graeme Revell.   Copyright 2005 Varese Sarabande.

 

Music from Southbound Original Motion Picture Soundtrack by The Gifted.  Copyright 2015 Headquarters Music.

 

All rights reserved.  Used by Kind Permission.

 

All songs available through Amazon Music.

DOCTOR WHO:  The Daleks Master Plan/The Ark

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The Daleks Master Plan

 

13 November 1965 – 29 January 1966

 

The Massacre

 

5 - 26 February 1966

The Ark

 

5 – 26 March 1966

 

Journey back to the captivating universe of timeless Doctor Who episodes from 1965 to 1967. Enjoy a nostalgic rollercoaster ride of extra-terrestrial adventures starting with the Daleks Master Plan, characterized by thrilling narratives, unforgettable characters, and an intriguing insight into the series. Relive the memorable performance of our venerated Doctor and delve into the fascinating world of the enigmatic "Master".

Discuss the unforgettable episodes, intriguing characters, and compelling facts about the show. Embark on a conversational journey to explore the enigmatic Mavic Chen, the Galactic Federation's fascinating concept, and the relevance of air purity in the series. Could this be a foreshadowing of climate change issues? Find your seat in this engaging conversation that explores the swinging sixties charm and magic of Doctor Who.

 

Discover the incredible popularity and lasting legacy of Doctor Who, where our speakers delve into viewer ratings and share nostalgic moments. Uncover how the series made its way into schools and captivated millions globally. Learn about the innovative filming techniques of the 60s that brought Doctor Who's universe to life, presenting a detailed narrative of the profound plot lines hidden in the Doctor's adventures.

 

End your journey by exploring the controversial use of historic footage in the series and the narratives surrounding our favorite characters. Engage with our panelists as they review the episodes and discuss the debuts of series greats like Michael Sheard and Roy Skelton. Stay tuned for final thoughts on standout moments, detailed ratings, and exciting social media updates. Dive into this vivid feast of Doctor Who memories today!

00:00:19 - A Journey to the Past: Exploring Doctor Who Episodes (1965-1967); 00:00:45 - Introducing the Daleks Master Plan and The Massacre; 00:03:23- Comic con plans and ongoing art exhibition; 00:05:44 - Visit to Harry Potter Land and discussing favorite books; 00:07:34 - Daleks’ Master Plan: Unveiling the Epic Journey Begins; 00:07:55 - Synopsis for Doctor Who, the Daleks’ Master Plan; 00:13:14 - Reviewing the Daleks Master Plan, a 12-episode journey; 00:19:06 - The potential of Doctor Who’s vast and universal universe; 00:21:47 - Ratings fluctuation and competition for viewership; 00:24:52 - Discussing the book title and its connection to the story; 00:28:00 - The Missing Story of the Massacre; 00:30:37 - Departing Paris as the Massacre Begins; 00:32:22 - Introduction to The Massacre and Online Animations; 00:34:56 - A Recap of ”The Massacre” Storyline; 00:37:19 - TARDIS Details and Ratings Drop; 00:40:24 - Studio Testing and Audience Reaction; 00:42:14 - The Ark: A Futuristic Adventure Begins; 00:54:02 - Cliffhanger for the Celestial Toy Room; 00:55:17 - Reflections on the Overall Experience; 00:56:08 - Social Media Plugs and Blog Updates;

Opening Credits– Epidemic Sound – Copyright . All rights reserved

 

Closing Credits:  Love Kills by Freddie Mercury.  Taken from the album Metropolis – Original Motion Picture Soundtrack by Georgio Moroder.   Copyright 1984 CBS Records.

Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 

 

All rights reserved.  Used by Kind Permission.

 

All songs available through Amazon Music.

February 2024

Home is A Lonely Number

BOOK TO SCREEN:  Once Upon A Time

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The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L Frank Baum 

 

The Wizard of Oz (1939)

Welcome to a highly engaging episode of the Literary License Podcast's Book to Screen series. In this episode, dive into the timeless world of 'The Wizard of Oz' by L. Frank Baum. Join hosts Keith Chawgo, Leandro Ghezzi and Vicky Rae as they delve into the mesmerizing world of Oz, discussing its origins, Broadway adaptation, and its iconic film version that made Judy Garland unforgettable.

 

Immerse in the journey of Dorothy Gale, Toto, and the magical Land of Oz. Discover or even re-discover why this classic American fairy tale remains close to our hearts as we go through the fascinating characters, landscapes, and intricate quests of the story. The episode also features a deep exploration of the symbolic elements and hidden messages within the story, shedding light on some intriguing theories and metaphors.

 

The podcast also eloquently touches upon the complexities of the digital existence in the era of social media. The conversation raises questions about our privacy and highlights the consequential aspects of our digital interactions. Important issues like online bullying and the psychological impact of social media are also addressed, stressing the need to discern the 'false reality' it presents.

 

Furthermore, revealing a refreshing perspective on pop culture, we share noteworthy insights relating to manipulation in media and the portrayal of 'happy' life in advertising. Then, we decant 'The Wizard of Oz' in contrast to its widely popular cinematic version, also exploring the narrative techniques in children's fantasy novels.

 

The conversation wraps up with a spirited critique of 'The Wizard of Oz' film, also touching upon its African American adaptation - 'The Wiz'. Offering significant insights into the casting and production, this thrilling episode leaves no stone unturned. So whether you're a fan of the original books or the picked adaptations, this episode promises a fresh and thorough perspective on the world of Oz.

00:00:00 - Introduction to Literary License Podcast’s Book to Screen Episode; 00:06:27 - Preparations for Moving to the US; 00:09:39 - Traffic and Infrastructure in Texas; 00:12:48 - Expressing Excitement about Returning to the US; 00:13:31 - The Origins of The Wizard of Oz; 00:15:10 - Introduction to Dorothy’s journey in the magical land of Oz; 00:18:57 - The Wizard reveals his true identity and grants the companions’ desires; 00:20:48 - Introduction to The Wizard of Oz and initial impressions; 00:24:16 - Wicked and the exploration of characters from the book; 00:27:54 - Discussion of Wicked and anticipation for its film adaptation; 00:31:14 - The illusion of appearances and the characters’ traits; 00:35:01 - L. Frank Baum’s interesting life and inspirations; 00:38:02 - Violence and dark elements in the original Oz book; 00:47:45 - The Challenge of Finding Reliable News Sources; 00:51:19 - The Impact of Social Media on Different Generations; 00:54:27 - The Discrepancy between Online and Real-Life Appearances; 00:58:24 - The Illusion of Reality TV and Raising Children; 01:02:20 - Relationships and the Importance of Hearing Both Sides; 01:06:04 - Historical Perspective on Natural Disasters; 01:09:37 - The Wizard of Oz: A Classic Five-Star Story; 01:12:14 - Ding Dong The Witch Is Dead - Ella Fitzgerald; 01:14:20 - Introduction and Background of The Wizard of Oz; 01:17:24 - The Wicked Witch’s sinister threat; 01:18:52 - Introduction and Initial Thoughts on The Wizard of Oz; 01:22:10 - Judy Garland’s Troubles and Alternative Casting Choices; 01:25:23 - Personal Reactions and Blu-ray Version; 01:29:15 - Noticing New Things in Munchkin Land; 01:36:58 - The Prologue and Original Singer of Over the Rainbow; 01:43:00 - Margaret Hamilton’s Presence and the Poppy Field Myth; 01:46:42 - The directors and financials of the film; 01:53:51 - Discussion on celebrities with gay children; 02:02:23 - Seeing the Red Shoes and Dorothy's Dress at the Smithsonian; 02:04:36 - Rating and Visual Effects of the Wizard of Oz; 02:11:40 - Wrapping up the Literary License Podcast; 02:14:37 - Closing Credits: Over the Rainbow by Ella Fitzgerald

Opening Credits– Epidemic Sound – Copyright . All rights reserved

 

Intermediate Song:  Ding Dong the Witch is Dead by Ella Fitzgerald.  Taken from the album Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Harold Arlen Songbook.   Copyright 1961 Verve Records.

 

Closing Credits:  Over the Rainbow by Ella Fitzgerald.  Taken from the album Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Harold Arlen Songbook.   Copyright 1961 Verve Records.

Original Music copyrighted 2020 Dan Hughes Music and the Literary License Podcast. 

 

All rights reserved.  Used by Kind Permission.

 

All songs available through Amazon Music.

BATMAN:  The Animated Series

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